Sophistically Obsidian

blunthought:

"We are not fighting for integration, nor are we fighting for separation. We are fighting for recognition as human beings…In fact, we are actually fighting for rights that are even greater than civil rights and that is human rights."
| Malcolm X

blunthought:

"We are not fighting for integration, nor are we fighting for separation. We are fighting for recognition as human beings…In fact, we are actually fighting for rights that are even greater than civil rights and that is human rights."

| Malcolm X

(via glovesinthesummertime)

defjamblr:

Congratulations to Public Enemy’s Chuck D for being this year’s ambassador for Record Store Day! #DefJam30

defjamblr:

Congratulations to Public Enemy’s Chuck D for being this year’s ambassador for Record Store Day! #DefJam30

stereogum:

The summer and fall of 2001 were tremendously exciting times to be a young rap nerd. Jay-Z and Nas were throwing lyrical haymakers at each other, scrambling for the upper hand, using every possible weapon at their disposal to wreck each other. Rap had had plenty of storied rivalries, of course, but we’d never heard two commercial, artistic titans going for blood like that, getting unrelentingly personal with every line. Nas talked about Jay’s “dick sucking lips” and “whiskers like a rat.” Jay made explicit reference to fucking Nas’s ex in Nas’s car. Only one thing was off-limits, and that one thing was Illmatic. That’s the one hot album in Jay’s “one hot album every ten year average” line from “The Takeover,” and you can even hear a bit of awe creep into his voice when he pronounces the album’s title. Talking about the Nas sample on his own “Dead Presidents,” Jay famously says, “You made it a hot line, I made it a hot song,” but at least he acknowledges that it was a hot line, you know? In fact, Illmatic sits there underneath everything Jay says on “The Takeover.” He couldn’t just say you’re garbage. He had to say look at all this enormous power and potential you had when you started; isn’t it too bad that you’re garbage now? Because what could Jay possibly say about Illmatic? It was, and is, untouchable — as perfect a piece of deep-in-its-own-head New York rap as we’re ever likely to hear. Some perspective here: Illmatic was only seven years old when Jay and Nas were having their back-and-forth. Seven years is nothing. Can you imagine someone coming at Kanye West’s head now but acknowledging, along the way, that at least Graduation was amazing? It would never happen. But Illmatic was canonized, justly, basically the instant it arrived. It’s an albatross for Nas, and for rap, and for everyone who likes thinking about rap. Because if an album like that was once possible, why can’t anyone make it now?
//
Read more at Illmatic Turns 20

stereogum:

The summer and fall of 2001 were tremendously exciting times to be a young rap nerd. Jay-Z and Nas were throwing lyrical haymakers at each other, scrambling for the upper hand, using every possible weapon at their disposal to wreck each other. Rap had had plenty of storied rivalries, of course, but we’d never heard two commercial, artistic titans going for blood like that, getting unrelentingly personal with every line. Nas talked about Jay’s “dick sucking lips” and “whiskers like a rat.” Jay made explicit reference to fucking Nas’s ex in Nas’s car. Only one thing was off-limits, and that one thing was Illmatic. That’s the one hot album in Jay’s “one hot album every ten year average” line from “The Takeover,” and you can even hear a bit of awe creep into his voice when he pronounces the album’s title. Talking about the Nas sample on his own “Dead Presidents,” Jay famously says, “You made it a hot line, I made it a hot song,” but at least he acknowledges that it was a hot line, you know? In fact, Illmatic sits there underneath everything Jay says on “The Takeover.” He couldn’t just say you’re garbage. He had to say look at all this enormous power and potential you had when you started; isn’t it too bad that you’re garbage now? Because what could Jay possibly say about Illmatic? It was, and is, untouchable — as perfect a piece of deep-in-its-own-head New York rap as we’re ever likely to hear. Some perspective here: Illmatic was only seven years old when Jay and Nas were having their back-and-forth. Seven years is nothing. Can you imagine someone coming at Kanye West’s head now but acknowledging, along the way, that at least Graduation was amazing? It would never happen. But Illmatic was canonized, justly, basically the instant it arrived. It’s an albatross for Nas, and for rap, and for everyone who likes thinking about rap. Because if an album like that was once possible, why can’t anyone make it now?

//

Read more at Illmatic Turns 20

thefinalimage:

Before Sunrise | 1995 | dir. Richard Linklater

I found it pretty much impossible to not be at least a little jealous of Ethan Hawke’s character (Jesse), and a lot of that is because of Julie Delpy, who’s character (Celine) just seems so cool and strong and confident and cute, and even though both characters believe that their one night together may be their last, it is fun as a viewer to watch this film now knowing that that is not the case. 

Before Sunset | 2004 | dir. Richard Linklater

The second installment of this unlikely trilogy may seem smaller because it is filmed in real time, but it doesn’t make it any less romantic, and even though Jesse is married with a son, creating a dilemma about whether or not it is even right for Jesse and Celine to act on their instincts, the chemistry between the two of them is unmatchable. 

Before Midnight | 2013 | dir. Richard Linklater

The Before Trilogy get better with each entry, and though this film is the least romantic of the three, it feels the most real, because no relationship is a fairytale and the people you love have the ability to hurt you the most, so seeing Jesse and Celine makeup in the final moments of the film after an entire act where they just argue, it feels natural and, in the end, perfect.

-01SentenceReviews

Am I really the only one that reads the Regents’ addendums to the manual?

(Source: onthespiral, via chimis-changa)

I Used To Love H.E.R.
Common

glovesinthesummertime:

And what I loved most, she had so much soul

(Source: musicforthetroubledmind)

364 plays

ajennifer:

regionsofkindness:

nathyfaith:

We know Garrett needs to die when he says things like this.

#natasha romanoff could literally be you better than you could (via drfitzy)

(x)

actual footage of natasha romanoff running into ward on the halls of shield

(Source: smalljons, via chimis-changa)

Cleo's Mood
Jr. Walker and The All-Stars / Shotgun, 1965

soulofmotown:

Cleo’s Mood - Jr. Walker & the All Stars (Shotgun, 1965)

(via klappersacks)

661 plays